Recipe

Buseot Sot-Bap

Buseot Sot Bap. Funky red miso, woody mushrooms, and smoky soy rice with a touch of sweetness from honey. This freshly steamed mushroom pot rice will keep you craving for more.

Written by Doobydobap

Buseot Sot Bap with Aka Miso,

aka Mushroom Pot Rice with Red Miso

When the days become colder, I immediately crave sot-bap. Sot-bap in Korean merely translates to pot-rice. What's beautiful about pot rice is that there can be thousands of variations depending on what toppings your heart desires. You can put vegetables, protein, seafood, anything imaginable. You'll be rewarded with delicately steamed toppings strawn on top of freshly steamed rice that absorbed all the nuances of your desired toppings. 

Since mushrooms are now in season, I made buseot sot bap, aka mushroom pot rice. This is personally my favorite pot rice. While most mushrooms are available year-round, foraged during the colder seasons are the peak of woodiness and earthiness. 

To balance out the woodiness of the mushrooms, using funky red miso made the most sense. Funky red miso, woody mushrooms, and smoky soy rice with a touch of sweetness from the honey. This freshly steamed mushroom pot rice will keep you craving for more. 

Tips & Tricks & Science! 

  • I put soy sauce in the rice mixture before cooking because cooked soy and fresh soy taste different. Cooked soy has a distinctly smoky and deep taste, whereas fresh soy in the sauce is saltier and more acidic. 
  • Soy sauce is more viscous and heavier than water. Therefore, the soy sauce will sink to the bottom and develop almost a smoky charred crispy rice bottom, which is key to this recipe. 
  • For the perfect pot rice, it's good to pre-soak the rice after rinsing so that each granule is evenly plump. This allows the heat and water to be evenly distributed and makes the rice fluffy.
  • The general rule of thumb for the perfect pot rice is a 1:1 ratio for soaked rice to water. However, this recipe is half a cup shy to account for the moisture from the sauce and the mushrooms. With less water, though, it's essential to keep a good eye on the heat, or the bottom may be prone to burning! 
  • This recipe calls for red aka miso. It's fermented the longest and is funkiest of all misos. For miso, the general rule of thumb is the darker the older. For instance, white shiro miso is the mildest and also sweet. It's best used for salad dressings. A little older than that is yellow shinshu miso, which is between white shiro and red aka. 
  • Feel free to use any mushrooms! Granted, they're edible… I love to mix roasted mushrooms and steamed mushrooms. I ended up putting more roasted mushrooms into the mushroom rice afterwards. Try roasting "meatier" mushrooms with butter! They will hold up better to the heat and roast beautifully.
  • Unless the mushrooms are extremely dirty, I usually just brush off excess dirt off mushrooms with a pastry brush. If extremely dirty, prepare a large bowl of water and soak the mushrooms and remove any dirt. Gently pat dry on kitchen linen and brush off using a pastry brush. 
  • Using a heavy-duty pot is imperative to pot rice! Brands like le Creuset, Staub, and lodge are all excellent options. I know they're a little pricier than the average pot, but it's a worthwhile investment as it's a pot that can be passed down generations. It's also incredibly versatile, so I highly recommend purchasing one. 

White, or shiro, miso is the mildest and is also called sweet or mellow miso. Red, or aka, miso, fermented longest, is the most pungent. Yellow, or shinshu, miso falls in the middle and is, to some, the most versatile

Ingredients

3 cups short-grain white rice (sushi rice)

2 ½ cups water 

4 cups mushroom of choice (I used enoki, oyster mushroom, shitake, and king oyster!)

2 tbsp soy sauce 

**Sauce**

3 tbsp red miso paste

3 tbsp soy sauce 

3 tbsp honey 

1 tsp sesame oil 

1 tbsp butter for pot rice

1 tbsp butter for pan-frying mushrooms

Directions

  1. Prep the mushrooms. Rip into bitesized pieces or slice thinly.
  2. Rinse the rice. Rub the granules against the palms of your hands. Repeat the process at least 7 times or until the water runs clear. 
  3. Soak the rice in cold water for 30 minutes. 
  4. Drain the soaked rice and transfer it into a heavy-duty pot.
  5. Add water, soy sauce, and mushrooms on top.
  6. Close the lid and heat on high until the mixture starts to boil. 
  7. Lower the heat to the lowest setting and cook for 12 minutes. 
  8. While the rice is cooking, score the king oyster mushroom diagonally. Make sure to not go all the way and only ⅓ of the way down. 
  9. Heat the skillet on medium-high heat and melt butter. 
  10. Once the butter starts foaming, place the king oyster mushroom scored side down. Turn the heat to a medium. 
  11. Press down on the middle part of the oyster as it fries. The oyster may start curling from the heat, and this allows for an even crust.  
  12. Turn the heat off. Let the rice rest, lid on. This process allows the rice to cook evenly from the residual heat and for perfectly fluffy beautiful rice. 
  13. Add 1 tbsp of butter while the rice is warm. Place the roasted mushrooms on top. 
  14. Pour the miso sauce over the rice. Gently mix with a wetted rice paddle. Enjoy! 

Buseot Sot Bap

4 from 105 votes
Recipe by Doobydobap Course: Dinner, Lunch, MainCuisine: KoreanDifficulty: Medium
Servings

4

servings
Prep time

15

minutes
Cooking time

15

minutes

Buseot Sot Bap, aka mushroom pot rice with red miso, woody mushrooms, and smoky soy rice will keep you craving for more.

Ingredients

  • 3 cups short-grain white rice (sushi rice)

  • 2 ½ cups water

  • 4 cups mushroom of choice (I used enoki, oyster mushroom, shitake, and king oyster!)

  • 2 tbsp soy sauce

  • Sauce
  • 3 tbsp red miso paste

  • 3 tbsp soy sauce

  • 3 tbsp honey

  • 1 tsp sesame oil

  • 1 tbsp butter for pot rice

  • 1 tbsp butter for pan-frying mushrooms

instructions

  • Prep the mushrooms. Rip into bitesized pieces or slice thinly.
  • Rinse the rice. Rub the granules against the palms of your hands. Repeat the process at least 7 times or until the water runs clear.
  • Soak the rice in cold water for 30 minutes.
  • Drain the soaked rice and transfer it into a heavy-duty pot.
  • Add water, soy sauce, and mushrooms on top.
  • Close the lid and heat on high until the mixture starts to boil.
  • Lower the heat to the lowest setting and cook for 12 minutes.
  • While the rice is cooking, score the king oyster mushroom diagonally. Make sure to not go all the way and only ⅓ of the way down.
  • Heat the skillet on medium-high heat and melt butter.
  • Once the butter starts foaming, place the king oyster mushroom scored side down. Turn the heat to a medium.
  • Press down on the middle part of the oyster as it fries. The oyster may start curling from the heat, and this allows for an even crust.
  • Turn the heat off. Let the rice rest, lid on. This process allows the rice to cook evenly from the residual heat and for perfectly fluffy beautiful rice.
  • Add 1 tbsp of butter while the rice is warm. Place the roasted mushrooms on top.
  • Pour the miso sauce over the rice. Gently mix with a wetted rice paddle. Enjoy!

Recipe Video

Notes

  • Feel free to use any mushrooms! Granted, they're edible… I love to mix roasted mushrooms and steamed mushrooms. I ended up putting more roasted mushrooms into the mushroom rice afterwards. Try roasting "meatier" mushrooms with butter! They will hold up better to the heat and roast beautifully.
  • The general rule of thumb for the perfect pot rice is a 1:1 ratio for soaked rice to water. However, this recipe is half a cup shy to account for the moisture from the sauce and the mushrooms. With less water, though, it's essential to keep a good eye on the heat, or the bottom may be prone to burning! 
  • Soy sauce is more viscous and heavier than water. Therefore, the soy sauce will sink to the bottom and develop almost a smoky charred crispy rice bottom, which is key to this recipe. 

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Hi, I’m Tina aka Doobydobap!

Food is my medium to tell stories and connect with people who share the same passion. My recipes are a culmination of my experiences. I hope you enjoy recreating them at home, and if you do, make sure to tag me on Instagram!


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